No More Woof : a doggie headset that translates canine thoughts into human speech

 

Head over to Indiegogo today and you’ll find a particularly wacky (and risky) project bidding for your investment. It’s a device that goes by the name of No More Woof, which admittedly sounds like it does horrible things to dogs’ vocal cords, but which actually promises something very different. It’s a canine-sized headset that consists of EEG recorders connected to a small Raspberry Pi computer and a loudspeaker, supposedly allowing “ionic current flows” in a dog’s brain to be translated into human speech. A $65 model is said to distinguish between three different thoughts, including tiredness and curiosity, while more expensive options will have more sensors and more powerful software.

The only hold-up (and it’s a big one) is that this project is being offered for crowdfunding while still at the concept stage, and all investment will be kept even if the funding target isn’t met. According to a disclaimer on the Indiegogo page:

“Yes, we HAVE achieved some results, but we are very far from a mass-producable product. That said, we believe that within a few years the technologies we are working with will revolutionize our relation to pets and animals.”

Indeed, there’s no evidence that ST, the Scandinavian research lab behind No More Woof and last year’s equally strange iRock rocking chair, has managed to come up with anything like a working prototype — or at least there’s no sign of one in the long-but-vacant video embedded below. Nevertheless, if dog barks are eventually mistranslated by this sort of “novelty science” (a word ST actually uses to describe its own research), who’ll be any the wiser?

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Do you ever wish you knew exactly what your dog is thinking? A team of designers from the Nordic Society for Invention and Discovery is playing Doctor Dolittle — they’ve developed a doggie headset that can read animal brainwaves and translate them into human speech. That’s just one of the many amazing scientific breakthroughs we’ve witnessed this week. South Korean scientists developed the world’s first nanobot that can both detect and treat cancer. Rawlemon unveiled a gigantic crystal ball that can magnify solar energy 10,000 times — that’s enough to harvest light from the sun, moon and clouds. For the first time, researchers at the University of Cambridge used an inkjet printer to print living retinal cells, which could be used to replace defective eye tissue. And this week, Inhabitat interviewed Natural Machine’s Chief Marketing Officer Lynette Kucsma to talk about an amazing new 3D printer that can cook up edible designs.

Anurag

Engineer by responsibility and Blogger by choice, Hi I am Anurag Ajmera from Ajmer (by birth) and living in Karnal and Delhi NCR for the last 20 years of my 24 years of life. Passionate about trekking, coding and discovering. I love to meet new people and do sketching in my spare time. Hard on my principles and soft on my skills I love to play football. Vegetarian by force I have respect for nature and its beauty.

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Anurag

Engineer by responsibility and Blogger by choice, Hi I am Anurag Ajmera from Ajmer (by birth) and living in Karnal and Delhi NCR for the last 20 years of my 24 years of life. Passionate about trekking, coding and discovering. I love to meet new people and do sketching in my spare time. Hard on my principles and soft on my skills I love to play football. Vegetarian by force I have respect for nature and its beauty.

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