“Geographical Passwords” That Can Never Be Hacked

goegraphical_password_that_can_never_be_hacked_quikrpostAbu Dhabi: With an ever-increasing cases of online account hacking being reported, it’s getting difficult to protect passwords and keep the accounts safe. But now n need to worry about it. A computer scientist Ziyad Al-Salloum of ZSS-Research in Ras Al Khaimah, UAE, has devised what he calls ‘geographical passwords’ to protect online accounts and keep the hackers at bay.

Writing in a freely available “open access” research paper in the International Journal of Security and Networks, Al-Salloum emphasizes how increasingly complicated our online lives are becoming with more and more accounts requiring more and more passwords. Moreover, he adds that even strong, but conventional passwords are a security risk in the face of increasingly sophisticated “hacker” tools that can break into servers and apply brute force to reveal passwords. Indeed, over the last few years numerous major corporations and organizations – LinkedIn, Sony, the US government, Evernote, Twitter, Yahoo and many others – have had their systems compromised to different degrees and overall millions of usernames and associated passwords have been harvested and even leaked online.

The geographical password system utilizes the geographical information derived from a specific memorable location around which the user has logged a drawn boundary- longitude, latitude, altitude, area of the boundary, its perimeter, sides, angles, radius and other features form the geographical password. For instance, the user might draw a six-side polygon around a geographical feature such as the Eiffel Tower, Uluru (also known as Ayer’s Rock), a particular promontory on the Grand Canyon, a local church, a particular tree in the woodland where they walk their dog…or any other geographical feature. Once created, the password is then “salted” by adding a string of hidden random characters that are user-specific and the geographical password and the salt “hashed” together. Thus, even if two users pick the same place as their geographical password the behind-the-scenes password settings is unique to them.

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If the system disallowed two users from picking the same location, this would make it much easier for adversaries to guess passwords. The guessability, or entropy, of a geographical password would increase significantly if the password comprised two or more pinpointed locations. Al-Salloum explains that a whole-earth map might have 360 billion tiles at 20 degrees of “zoom,” which offers an essentially limitless number of essentially unguessable geographical passwords.

The research was published in the International Journal of Security and Networks.

 

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Anurag

Engineer by responsibility and Blogger by choice, Hi I am Anurag Ajmera from Ajmer (by birth) and living in Karnal and Delhi NCR for the last 20 years of my 24 years of life. Passionate about trekking, coding and discovering. I love to meet new people and do sketching in my spare time. Hard on my principles and soft on my skills I love to play football. Vegetarian by force I have respect for nature and its beauty.

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Anurag

Engineer by responsibility and Blogger by choice, Hi I am Anurag Ajmera from Ajmer (by birth) and living in Karnal and Delhi NCR for the last 20 years of my 24 years of life. Passionate about trekking, coding and discovering. I love to meet new people and do sketching in my spare time. Hard on my principles and soft on my skills I love to play football. Vegetarian by force I have respect for nature and its beauty.

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